CalTrac devblog – Material design and chronic health problems.

It’s been two months since the caltrac-kivy repo was updated on github and there is good reason why. Namely, having to write this paper in spanish about the project and exams. Well two things have happened since then which are that exams are over (for now) and the CalTrac project has passed into the national stage of the Science and Technology Fair of my country. This leaves a lot of expectations to be met, some of which I did not feel were met in the engineering fair where the project was knocked out of nationals in the regional elimination round. I feel that the amount of research I was able to commit to the regional entry for science & tech fair was much greater than what I had been able to prepare for the engineering competition partially because I had about one week after I blew my two week vacation on the mobile app release to prepare the written materials. One might imagine that jumping platforms, changing interface library and inventing statistics methods might have a lot to write about and it I did not feel it was my best work compared to the science fair entry. Luckily such was recognized at the latter fair and the nationals in early november are my goal now. I will outline my main points going into this:

  • Using KivyMD for a material design compliant UI. Already working on that.
  • Handling diabetics. I am currently in an email conversation with professors from the University of CR on the subject. I feel there is no better standard to implement and present at a national level than the educational and nutritional standards of our constitutional education facility.
  • Pregnant women. This is the same situation as above.
  • This is a thought in my head that I’m probably going to research after posting this: It’s known to people with a grasp on nutrition that a calorie is not a static amount of energy. Whether or not we can provide a proportion to how much one calorie is really worth with an extra input might work.
  • Localization. The code is embedded in my local files and honestly it’s just kinda sleeping until I provide the rest of the features. Everything listed above requires text and, to constantly add onto the localization for every thing I do instead of making sure everything is accounted for at once sounds like less of a mess for my brain to process.

I do expect to be publishing this iteration of the app into a new (again) github repository. Stay tuned for that. I’d like to note that I hope to submit devlogs, vlogs and photos to the ULACIT for their student leadership grant to study software engineering.

CalTrac, the calorie tracker.

Experimental Calorie recommendation and tracker

CalTrac is a graphical desktop application with a goal to visualize and raise awareness on the importance of calorie intake in our daily diet. Current nutritional standards generalize us into the 2000 calorie diet and our purpose in this project is so both find where we might find ourselves in the personal calorie needs, and to create an application that puts this value in context with what we eat by portion count. Nutrition is a numeric matter and CalTrac’s codebase is a combination of Python 2.7 and SQLite3 implementations. Native look and feel is provided by Python’s minimalist Tkinter library. The application achieves a desired personal estimate on caloric intake needs by the well-studied Harris-Benedict equation and provides recommendations on losing and gaining weight over time by means of hard limits on how little we should eat, and works in standard increments of 500 calories per day. This is complemented by a personal tracker of items eaten, summarizing them in calorie intake by portion which is compared as a total with the recommended intake number.

Have a look at the source code and make changes over at: https://shiburizu.github.io/caltrac/