promobanner

The Art of CalTrac in Material Design

Whew! So the update is out after a few hours of slaving over Photoshop (on my Linux Mint install might I add) and fidgeting with Android’s packaging process. I’m pleased to see that Play Store approved my update pretty much instantly. Anyway, here are the new promotional assets in their full glory. Download the app!

And I did not forget about freedom, check out the source on GitHub.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

CalTrac devblog #2 – Material design, reporting in!

I’m pleased to report that not even a week after posting my first devblog I have enough coming out to release another — I think I’ll be tying them to Play Store updates. I found that working with the sparsely documented KivyMD framework for Material Design compliant widgets was a breeze in how they worked as I’d expect them to.

caltracmd

The update comes at the same time as I use a new phone, adding to a repertoire of phones I have lying around to do tests. On two of them it seems to be smooth sailing. This is also demanding some new promo art on the play store page to match the material design motif, which will come with the update.

So what about the other stuff you said you were going to, oh so hurried developer? Let’s do a bullet list like last time:

  • The appropriate research information for pregnancy is in place and translating that into code is the next step.
  • I have not had luck in contacting the appropriate UCR professors for diabetics. Still have a big todolist prior to working on that.
  • Localization stuff has code in place but until everything else is checked off it won’t be translated into functionality.

So in keeping with free software this update will go out on to the github repository with appropriate installation instructions at the same time as I submit the Play update. Cheers.

CalTrac, the calorie tracker.

Experimental Calorie recommendation and tracker

CalTrac is a graphical desktop application with a goal to visualize and raise awareness on the importance of calorie intake in our daily diet. Current nutritional standards generalize us into the 2000 calorie diet and our purpose in this project is so both find where we might find ourselves in the personal calorie needs, and to create an application that puts this value in context with what we eat by portion count. Nutrition is a numeric matter and CalTrac’s codebase is a combination of Python 2.7 and SQLite3 implementations. Native look and feel is provided by Python’s minimalist Tkinter library. The application achieves a desired personal estimate on caloric intake needs by the well-studied Harris-Benedict equation and provides recommendations on losing and gaining weight over time by means of hard limits on how little we should eat, and works in standard increments of 500 calories per day. This is complemented by a personal tracker of items eaten, summarizing them in calorie intake by portion which is compared as a total with the recommended intake number.

Have a look at the source code and make changes over at: https://shiburizu.github.io/caltrac/